Posts Tagged ‘newborn health’

Child Safety Tips: As mercury goes up, so do safety risks for kids!

June 2, 2010

By picpoke.com

Yes, it is really getting hot out there this week!!!  Coming from Florida to DC last year, I thought “OK, so it will not get nearly as hot up here, or at least not as early in the summer.”  Yes, I was wrong.  This thought brought me to thinking about some of the fun things to do in the summer, but also the dangers for our little ones during this time if we are not extra careful.  Lo and behold, I found this article today, courtesy of the Dallas Morning News and reprinted by the Kansas City Star:

Emergency-room professionals have their own name for the long, lovely, lazy days that kids look forward to in summer: trauma season. Because that’s when hospitals see a spike in drownings and heat-related accidents.

The article discusses several myths and related facts associated with those myths.  Here are a few samples from the article:

MYTH: Pool parties are safe as long as adults are around.

FACT: Many drownings happen when adults are close by. The problem is too much commotion. The key is to have a designated adult watching the water because that is where the danger is. The pool should be free of excess toys that can block the view of the water.

MYTH: Floaties keep little ones safe in the water.

FACT: Floaties are designed for fun, not safety. They give a false sense of security, can deflate and can slip off.

MYTH: The kids will be fine in the pool for the short time it takes to answer the phone or get a cold drink.

FACT: In a minute, a child can go under water. In two or three minutes, the child can lose consciousness. In four or five, the child could suffer irreversible brain damage or die. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional, injury-related death for children 1 to 14 years old, second only to car and transportation-related accidents.

The article states several other myths and facts, which include the hazards of leaving children unattended in cars and car seats, as well as sun exposure and dehydration.  We encourage you to read the article in its entirety.  Let’s all have a safe summer out there, please!!

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Use Of Acetaminophen In Pregnancy Associated With Increased Asthma Symptoms In Children

February 6, 2010

Medical News Today recently issued a report on a study, done by the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, in which children who were exposed to acetominophen (Tylenol) prenatally were at increased risk to have asthma symptoms by age 5.  Use Of Acetaminophen In Pregnancy Associated With Increased Asthma Symptoms In Children.

While the study involved 300 African-American and Dominican Republic children living in New York City, the potential relevance for broader concern for African-American and Hispanic children  is evident.

[The study] found that the relationship was stronger in children with a variant of a gene, glutathione S transferase, involved in detoxification of foreign substances. The variant is common among African-American and Hispanic populations. The results suggest that less efficient detoxification is a mechanism in the association between acetaminophen and asthma.

“These findings might provide an explanation for some of the increased asthma risk in minority communities and suggest caution in the use of acetaminophen in pregnancy,” says Matthew S. Perzanowski, PhD, assistant professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health.

What is of some related interest is the fact that online postings regarding acetaminophen suggest that this may be the drug of choice for conditions as short-term fever and minor pain during surgery.

For example, Medicinenet.com’s posting, (which certainly predates this study) states in pertinent part:

SIDE EFFECTS: When used appropriately, side effects with acetaminophen are rare.

This most recent study appears to have some similarity to a prior study, at least according to the article on Medical News Today:

In a similar study conducted in the UK, the frequency of acetaminophen use during pregnancy and the magnitude of association in the UK study were similar to that in New York City.

So – Moms-To-Be, consider discussing this study with your OB before reaching for that bottle of Tylenol.