Use Of Acetaminophen In Pregnancy Associated With Increased Asthma Symptoms In Children

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Medical News Today recently issued a report on a study, done by the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, in which children who were exposed to acetominophen (Tylenol) prenatally were at increased risk to have asthma symptoms by age 5.  Use Of Acetaminophen In Pregnancy Associated With Increased Asthma Symptoms In Children.

While the study involved 300 African-American and Dominican Republic children living in New York City, the potential relevance for broader concern for African-American and Hispanic children  is evident.

[The study] found that the relationship was stronger in children with a variant of a gene, glutathione S transferase, involved in detoxification of foreign substances. The variant is common among African-American and Hispanic populations. The results suggest that less efficient detoxification is a mechanism in the association between acetaminophen and asthma.

“These findings might provide an explanation for some of the increased asthma risk in minority communities and suggest caution in the use of acetaminophen in pregnancy,” says Matthew S. Perzanowski, PhD, assistant professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health.

What is of some related interest is the fact that online postings regarding acetaminophen suggest that this may be the drug of choice for conditions as short-term fever and minor pain during surgery.

For example, Medicinenet.com’s posting, (which certainly predates this study) states in pertinent part:

SIDE EFFECTS: When used appropriately, side effects with acetaminophen are rare.

This most recent study appears to have some similarity to a prior study, at least according to the article on Medical News Today:

In a similar study conducted in the UK, the frequency of acetaminophen use during pregnancy and the magnitude of association in the UK study were similar to that in New York City.

So – Moms-To-Be, consider discussing this study with your OB before reaching for that bottle of Tylenol.

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